Archive \ Volume.4 2013 Issue 1

Study of the effects of perceived organizational justice and its components on organizational commitment of administrative and financial employees of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences general hospitals in 2012

Ramin Ravangard , Zahra Sajjadnia , Najme Ansarizade
Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to review the effects of perceived organizational justice and its components on organizational commitment of administrative and financial employees of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences general hospitals in 2012. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study conducted in 2012. The population in study was all administrative and financial staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences general hospitals. A sample size of 120 staff was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The required data were gathered using two questionnaires: The modified Persian version of the organizational justice questionnaire developed by Niehoff and Moorman and the Persian version of the organizational commitment questionnaire developed by Allen and Meyer. Also, respondents were asked about their demographic profiles. The response rate was 82%. The collected data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences 16.0 (SPSS) through some statistical tests such as Independent t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), Pearson correlation coefficient and Multiple Linear Regression (Stepwise method). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean score of perceived organizational justice and organizational commitment were 72.80 and 75.93, respectively. The results showed that affective and normative commitment, as well as total organizational commitment had significant positive correlations with total organizational justice and its three components, that is, procedural, distributive, and interactional justice (respectively, r = 0.544, r = 0.476, r = 0.463, r = 0.509, and P < 0.001). However, continuance commitment had only a significant positive correlation with procedural justice (r = 0.206, P = 0.042). Stepwise multiple regression analysis also showed that only procedural and interactional justice had statistically significant relationships with total organizational commitment (B = 0.511, B = 0.599, and P < 0.05). Conclusion: Improving organizational justice can continuously increase employees’ commitment. Therefore, hospital administrators should pay more attention to implement and enhance organizational justice and its components especially procedural and interactional justice in the organization, provide opportunities for supervisors to be trained in behaving better towards employees (interactional justice), and develop a fair system for employees’ performance evaluation and their promotions (procedural justice), as well as the provision of rewards (distributive justice) based on related standards.