Archive \ Volume.2 2011 Issue 1

Assessing Attitudes of Patients towards Chronic Disease Self-management in Singapore

Kwong Si Zheng , Kwan Yu Heng , Benjamin Seng , Helena Hor Mei Ling , Joanne Yeh Chang
Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of patients in Singapore suffering from chronic disorders towards their disease management. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire administered by 2nd year Pharmacy students. Patients with at least one of these cardiovascular risk conditions (hypertension, diabetes, and/or hypercholesterolemia) in the outpatient hospital pharmacy were interviewed. Data was analysed using non-parametric statistics (Chi-square and Spearman’s rho) to assess the association between demographic variables and patient selfmanagement habits. Results: A total of 211 surveys were collected. More than 50% of patients did not seek further knowledge of their medical condition (52.1%). Most of them could not remember names of the medications (55.5%). This was largely due to a combination of low English literacy (26%) and difficult medication names (25%). Only 18% of patients possessed competent self-management habits. An association was demonstrated between competent self-management habits and income (p<0.001), educational attainment (p<0.001), and race (p=0.020). Conclusion: Only a minority of patients currently possess competent self-management habits, which may pose a barrier to patient-centred care. Income, educational attainment and race are important predictors of patient propensity towards disease self-management.Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of patients in Singapore suffering from chronic disorders towards their disease management. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire administered by 2nd year Pharmacy students. Patients with at least one of these cardiovascular risk conditions (hypertension, diabetes, and/or hypercholesterolemia) in the outpatient hospital pharmacy were interviewed. Data was analysed using non-parametric statistics (Chi-square and Spearman’s rho) to assess the association between demographic variables and patient selfmanagement habits. Results: A total of 211 surveys were collected. More than 50% of patients did not seek further knowledge of their medical condition (52.1%). Most of them could not remember names of the medications (55.5%). This was largely due to a combination of low English literacy (26%) and difficult medication names (25%). Only 18% of patients possessed competent self-management habits. An association was demonstrated between competent self-management habits and income (p<0.001), educational attainment (p<0.001), and race (p=0.020). Conclusion: Only a minority of patients currently possess competent self-management habits, which may pose a barrier to patient-centred care. Income, educational attainment and race are important predictors of patient propensity towards disease self-management.